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The role of repetitive strain in workplace injuries

| Apr 24, 2021 | Workplace Accidents

What do you picture when you think of a workplace injury? Like most people in New Jersey, you may have pictured something like broken bones or head traumas. However, workplace injuries are not always the result of serious accidents. Many workers’ injuries can be traced back to repetitive movements. 

Repetitive strain injuries 

You might have also heard these types of injuries called repetitive motion injuries. In some jobs or occupations, workers have to repeat specific movements over and over during an average workday. This repeated or repetitive movement can cause a worker’s body to eventually break down. 

Repetitive strain injuries are often extremely painful. This pain paired with limited range of motion also limits victims’ ability to continue performing their job duties. Some people even find it difficult to maintain any type of gainful employment. Some common examples of repetitive strain injuries with which you might already be familiar include some of the following: 

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome 
  • Cubital tunnel syndrome 
  • Radial tunnel syndrome 
  • Tendinitis 
  • Hearing loss 
  • Chronic back and neck pain 

Proving an injury is related to work 

Workers’ compensation benefits can be an invaluable tool for addressing workplace injuries. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for New Jersey employers to try and blame worker injuries on anything else, including preexisting conditions. While this can be stressful, you do not have to go through the process of applying for benefits or appealing a denied claim alone. You can learn more about the workers’ compensation process and finding the right guidance by visiting our website.